June 2012
PRESS RELEASE · LSU (and College of Science, LSU) · LSU Today

July 2012
International Conference Held In Honor of Roy P. Daniels Professor and LSU Distinguished Research Master Jerry P. Draayer, President of Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA)

HITES 2012 Participants
More than 100 people, including some of the most prominent scientists from the U.S. and abroad, paid tribute to Draayer's world-wide recognized research and academic achievements, honored during Horizons of Innovative Theories, Experiments, and Supercomputing in Nuclear Physics, or HITES 2012, international conference held June 4 - 7 in the historic New Orleans French Quarter. The conference opening speech was offered by Prof. Michael Cherry (Chair, Department of Physics & Astronomy, LSU), and the meeting was closed by the director of Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) Physics Division Dr. David Dean. Many Draayer's colleagues from LSU, LA Board of Regents, and Southeastern Universities Research Association (SURA), as well as family members joined the celebratory ceremony in his honor. The closing speech was offered by Dean Kevin Carman, Dean of LSU's College of Basic Sciences, who acknowledged Draayer's contribution to our university.

The conference was an enormous success and promoted strong inter-disciplinary dialogs. In particular, it brought together not only experts in nuclear theory, but also in experimental nuclear physics, high-energy physics, astrophysics, and, above all, in computer science, as well as leaders of various organizations that deal with present-day challenges on education, science policy, and international outreach.

Draayer offered a public lecture "What a Wonderful World -- Simplicity within Complexity"
Draayer offered a public lecture "What a Wonderful World -- Simplicity within Complexity" that opened with the tunes of "What a Wonderful World" by New Orleans' favorite Louis Armstrong. While Armstrong was marveling at the simple things we see in the world around us, Draayer was explaining the invisible wonders unveiled in the world of nuclear physics -- from quarks/gluons through exotic nuclei to the universe. "In jazz, and especially in Blues," Draayer said, "some notes are sung or played at a pitch lower than the major scale. As with Jazz, Physics is a Restless Science; flattened notes track symmetry breaking." Draayer's lecture then focused on discovering emerging symmetries, or simplicities, within complex nuclear systems, which in turn, can pinpoint the fundamentals of nature.
Among the conference attendees -- many of which are former or current Draayer's collaborators -- special guests included Prof. Akito Arima, former President of the University of Tokyo and now head of the Japan Science Foundation, recipient of the Tom W. Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics; Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Walter Greiner, C4 Professor and Director of the Institute for Advance Studies of the University of Frankfurt, Germany; Dr. Amy Flatten, Director of International Affairs, American Physical Society (APS), who addressed issues regarding challenges for science in the emerging global economy; Prof. Joseph Hamilton, Director of Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, ORNL, who played a key role in the discovery of a new super-heavy element; Prof. K. Ted Hecht, Professor emeritus at University of Michigan and Draayer's postdoc advisor; Dr. Lee Riedinger, Director of University of Tennessee/ORNL Center for Interdisciplinary Research and Graduate Education, who talked on the role of university consortia in the national science agenda; Dr. Brad Sherrill, Chief Scientist at Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University; Dr. Robert Wiringa, Argonne National Laboratory, 2010 recipient of the Tom W. Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics; and Prof. Stuart Pittel, Director of Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, who gave a presentation, "The atomic nucleus at 100 and Jerry Draayer at 70: Two histories interwoven", that paid tribute to Draayer's research and his role in the development of Nuclear Physics.
Prof. Akito Arima, former President of the University of Tokyo and now head of the Japan Science Foundation, recipient of the prestigious Tom W. Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics in 1993. Dr. Amy Flatten, Director of International Affairs, American Physical Society (APS), who addressed issues regarding challenges for science in the emerging global economy.


Keynote speakers, Prof. D. Rowe (University of Toronto), Prof. W. Nazarewicz (University of Tenn. & ORNL, Scientific Director of Holifield Radioactive Ion-Beam Facility, and 2012 recipient of the Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics), Prof. M. Ploszajczak (GANIL), Prof. W. Haxton (UC Berkeley & former Director of Institute for Nuclear Theory), Dr. R. Laviolette (Advanced Scientific Computing Research at U.S. DOE), and Dr. R. McKeown (Deputy Director for Science at Jefferson Lab, 2009 recipient of the Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics), provided an overview of the latest developments and novel approaches for the 21st century in nuclear physics, astrophysics, hadronic physics, and scientific computing research. Conference co-chair Prof. J. Vary (Iowa State University) talked about a recent nuclear theory breakthrough, namely, predictions for the proton-dripping Fluorine-14 that he and collaborators made based on an ab initio (from first principles) nuclear structure model and that were later confirmed by an experimental study.

Draayer (middle) received a certificate of appreciation in recognition of his exceptional contribution to the Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, signed by Dr. Hugh E. Montgomery, Director of Jefferson Lab, presented by Dr. Robert McKeown (right), Deputy Director for Science at Jefferson Lab, 2009 recipient of the Bonner Prize in Nuclear Physics; chairing the session, LSU's Prof. Edward Zganjar, (left), Alumni Professor Emeritus of Physics.
During the conference, Draayer received various letters and certificates of appreciation, commemorative plaques, and commemorative gifts in recognition of his exceptional contribution to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (signed by Dr. Hugh E. Montgomery, Director of Jefferson Lab), to the Southeastern Universities Research Association, as well as to the National Society of Black Physicist & National Society of Hispanic Physicists (presented by Vanderbilt University's Prof. David J. Ernst, Board Chair, SURA), to the International Scientific Affairs of APS (presented by Dr. Amy Flatten, Director of International Affairs, APS), to the Louisiana Board of Regents (presented by LSU's Prof. Michael Khonsari, LA EPSCoR Project Director and Board of Regents Associate Commissioner for Sponsored Research and Development), and to the Department of Physics & Astronomy (presented by Prof. Michael Cherry, Chair, Department of Physics & Astronomy, LSU).

Undergraduate Alison Dreyfuss (Keene State College), an REU student at LSU in Summer 2011, was selected by SAC to give an invited talk.
The conference welcomed many young emerging scientists, as well as undergraduate students from universities in Baton Rouge, New Orleans, and New Hampshire, together with graduate students in theoretical and experimental nuclear physics.

Proceedings of the meeting will be published in the open-access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of IOP Conference Series.



The conference was sponsored by Louisiana State University; Center for Computation and Technology (CCT), LSU; Department of Physics and Astronomy, LSU; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); International HPC Initiative for Advanced Research; and J. Bennett Johnston Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures & Devices (CAMD), LSU.



Conference website: www.phys.lsu.edu/hites2012.